My 2016 Short/Long Predictions

2015 was quite the year. It was the year that saw the legalization of gay marriage and the proliferation of legalized marijuana; the rise of Isis and domestic mass shootings; Trump and Caitlin hitting the national stage; the first-ever flyby of Pluto; the death of Yogi Berra and Bobbi Kristina Brown; the fall and rise of the Patriots; and the invention of the genius app that blocks all Kardashian News. 2016 will certainly be one a wacky and record-breaking one, too, with another potential global recession looming, the end of rock bottom interest rates, the presidential election and the Olympics. [...]

By | 2017-01-23T08:54:51+00:00 January 1st, 2016|Finance 101|1 Comment

How To: Recover from a Spending Hangover

It’s an easy thing to do: blow your entire month’s budget on holiday shopping, festive outfits, and dining out. Trust me: I’ve been there, too. It wasn’t until I had graduated from college and landed my dream job at CNN that I got my first credit card. I know, I know…I was a bit behind the times. But I was raised in an immigrant family, where cash was queen and debt was just not okay. I made the move to Atlanta to start my new job, and suddenly there were all of these things that I thought I needed…or at [...]

By | 2017-01-23T08:54:51+00:00 December 29th, 2015|Finance 101|0 Comments

Quiz: Do You Have Your Financial You-Know-What Together??

Take the Capital One Money Millennial Mindset Quiz to find out! 1. Do you have a plan for saving each month? A) I put a certain amount of my paycheck away each month. B) Sure, I save some—but I spend more. C) Plan? What plan? It is so important that you put away money each month, even just a little. If you are ever in an emergency situation, you’re going to need some emergency cash (I recommend at least 3-6 months’ worth of expenses in the bank at all times). Sign up for automatic savings deposit, which will drop a set [...]

By | 2017-01-23T08:54:51+00:00 December 16th, 2015|Finance 101|1 Comment

This Just In: You’re More Financially Responsible Than They Thought!

Some welcome news before those cringe-worthy money queries you will undoubtedly get from your parents and relatives this holiday season: a recent survey conducted by Capital One found that Millennials, long criticized for their lack of savings and seemingly endless spending in the discretionary category, are actually doin’ just fine. Wait – really? Yep! Sure, we’re waiting longer to hit major life milestones like getting married and buying a house, but we’re also loud and proud with our commitment (and, ahem, attraction) to financial responsibility. Two thirds (67%) of those surveyed said they would rather have a steady job with [...]

By | 2017-01-23T08:54:51+00:00 December 11th, 2015|Finance 101|0 Comments

How To: Organize Your Paper Trail STAT!

If you’re a cash-only person and you don’t hang on to old bills, stop it! Ask for receipts to help you track where the money is really going. And don’t crumple them and toss them into your purse, only to find them smooshed up with gum at the bottom of your purse (not that I would know anything about that...). At the very least, keep your receipts in a container or a large envelope. Even better, set up a filing system to separate the different categories of expenses: one folder for food, one for rent—you get the idea. Keep it on your desk or anywhere you can get easy access to [...]

By | 2017-01-23T08:54:52+00:00 November 23rd, 2015|Finance 101|0 Comments

3 Things You Don’t Know About Your Income (But Should)

Money might not be so easy to earn, but it is easy to calculate. What comes in is your “income” (duh). But, as you’ve probably noticed from your pay stubs, the money you bring home isn’t the actual salary you signed up for. So here are three things to know NOW about how much money you're actually making: The difference between "gross" and "net." Not all income is created equal. Gross income is the whole shebang, before Uncle Sam takes out a bunch of taxes. After that, it's called net income, or whatever you actually take in. (BTW, a synonym for net income is “earned income.”) Yes, [...]

By | 2017-01-23T08:54:52+00:00 November 23rd, 2015|Finance 101|0 Comments

What’s the Deal With Those Banking Booths, Anyway?! (And How to Choose One That’s Right For You)

If you’ve been getting the feeling that those pop-up banking booths are everywhere on college and university campuses lately, you’re not seeing things. Banks prey upon college students. Why? Because they’re potential new customers who are still building brand loyalty and forming their financial identities. Just don’t give in to the pressure: as with Biology 101, you need to do your homework before signing up for an account with any of them. There are three main types of banks to park your money these days: credit unions, regular banks and online banks. If you want a real human to interact [...]

By | 2017-01-23T08:54:53+00:00 November 3rd, 2015|Finance 101|0 Comments

7 Bitches Who Are Always Broke

Are you one of these people, or know someone who is? Let me be clear. Being a Rich Bitch is good. (Rich Bitches are the good kinda bitches, like Glinda in The Wizard of Oz, not the bad bitches like the Wicked Witch of the West.) It’s about empowerment. It’s about taking control. Being a Rich Bitch means going after what you want in life by getting the financial part in order. Because let’s be honest: you need money to live the life you want. You need to set your goals, and figure out how to achieve them. Your mission [...]

By | 2017-01-23T08:54:53+00:00 October 26th, 2015|Finance 101|0 Comments

The Case for Your Morning Pumpkin Spice Latte

If there is one investment I suggest over and over again, it’s this: invest in yourself. Of course, bonds and mutual funds can be great ways to grow your money over time. But few investments will pay dividends down the road like investing in you. And that’s why I make the case for your morning latte. You’re welcome! Most other “financial experts” will tell you to give up your daily coffee shop run and save more than $1,500 per year. But I say: think of yourself as having billable hours, like a lawyer. Whatever it is—$20/hour or $500 like a [...]

By | 2017-01-23T08:54:54+00:00 October 14th, 2015|Finance 101|0 Comments
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